event

Pretty Enough To Eat

Salad-in-waiting; pretty to look at and delicious to eat. (Garden of Claudia and Jonathan Fast)

Salad-in-waiting; pretty to look at and delicious to eat. (Garden of Claudia and Jonathan Fast)

Gone are the days where ‘salad’ meant a limp lettuce leaf and a dollop of salad cream (in the UK) or ranch dressing (in the USA)! Leaf crops such as spinach, peppery arugula and crunchy kale jostle with a tantalizing blend of colorful lettuce varieties. Harvest some young beet leaves, carrot tops and herbs and you have a fabulous base to add cherry tomatoes, sliced cucumbers, bell peppers and spring onions. The adventurous chef may even sprinkle in a few edible flowers for a garnish.

Add fresh carrot leaves to your salads; Purple Dragon has purple foliage

Add fresh carrot leaves to your salads; Purple Dragon has purple foliage

Buying all those ingredients at the store isn’t cheap, however, and how often have you had to throw out the last of the salad leaves because it went bad? The good news is that we can grow all of these in our own gardens – even if we only have a small patio. If you’re new to edible gardening start with something easy such as lettuce, especially if you grow  one of the ‘cut and come again’ or mesclun’ blends.

How to grow lettuce 

If you are planting out lettuce seedlings be sure to space them apart 6" or so

If you are planting out lettuce seedlings be sure to space them apart 6″ or so

Whether you are planting in the ground or a container be sure the soil is weed free and friable (that just means that it crumbles easily in your hand rather than a wet clod of clay or superfine and sand-like). Do not fertilize; too much nitrogen can make the flavor bitter

Select an area that receives 4-6 hours of direct sun each day, preferably in the morning. Many lettuce varieties will bolt in high summer and/or hot afternoon sun and actually prefer to get direct morning sun but afternoon shade. You may be able to shade them by planting on the eastern side of a row of tall tomatoes or beans for example

Loosely sprinkle the seed onto the soil surface as directed on the packet, cover with ~1/4″ soil and water thoroughly but gently.

If you are planting out seedlings space them approx. 6″ apart to allow room for them to grow. I use a row marker to keep the lines straight.

Keep the soil bed moist.

Harvesting

Cut what you need for now - and come back for more later

Cut what you need for now – and come back for more later

For cut and come again varieties harvest leaves with scissors, leaving the main plant in situ.

For head lettuce thin to spacing indicated on the packet (eat the thinnings!)

Sow small amounts of seed every 2-3 weeks to extend the harvest

Tips

Lettuce and Swiss chard are easy companions

Lettuce and Swiss chard are easy companions

There is no need to work lettuce into a crop rotation. Just plant them where space permits between slower growing plants.

Water in the morning to reduce the likelihood of fungal disease developing.

Problems

Squirrel damage!

Squirrel damage!

Slugs – use Sluggo Plus or set beer traps

Bolting – some varieties are more prone to this than others. Also dry soil can cause this.

Squirrels, rabbits and more! – Rabbits won’t jump into beds that are 18″ tall so a taller container or custom height raised bed may be your answer. Squirrels were an unexpected challenge when we filmed our class in San Diego but we think we have them thwarted by adding a hoop structure over a raised bed and covering it with window screen.

Favorite varieties

I grow Jericho head lettuce at the base of beans to make the most of space but also give some shading

I grow Jericho head lettuce at the base of beans to make the most of space but also give some shading

There are SO many to choose from but I always leave room for;

Jericho – a crunchy, romaine type lettuce that is very resistant to bolt.

Little Gem – a classic semi-cos variety that is crunchy but tender

Gourmet Baby Greens – a mesclun mix from Botanical Interests

 

Interested in more ideas for easy vegetable gardening? You might also enjoy The Movable Feast.

Take a unique hostess gift; skip the flowers!

Take a unique hostess gift; skip the flowers!

Resources

Building a Raised Bed Garden; our NEW video class for Craftsy teaches you everything you need to know with step-by-step instruction. Discover more and get up to a 50% discount!

Raised Bed Workshop; live in the Seattle area? Join Andy and I in our garden May 16th for a morning of instruction, demonstration, and inspiration. Limited space – get the details

 

 

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon
SUBSCRIBE





When Less is More

IMG_0737

The Northwest Flower and Garden Show is always a highlight of the gardening year for me. Whether you are new to gardening or an experienced designer you will leave inspired, encouraged and ready for spring.

The display gardens take center stage, their styles ranging from whimsical to naturalistic but all find a way to connect to the annual theme which for this year was ROMANCE. Every garden offers an abundance of ideas yet there is always one designer who for me stands out from the crowd; Karen Stefonick of Karen Stefonick Designs.

The title of her 2015 design featured here is KNOTTY & NICE; Here’s to WE Time.

IMG_0868

Here’s what Karen said about her design;

“For a couple seeking to connect, play, relax and set time aside to be with each other—“we time”—this garden caters to both the masculine and feminine senses; calling in the energy of both.

The ‘Knotty’ reference to this part of the vignette is both the trees and plantings which are various forms of pine as well as large beams of pine wood used to create the structure. Meanwhile, the ‘Nice’ traits are displayed by the more feminine attributes of lyrical water, warm fire and cozy furnishings.

A protective pergola surrounded by large bold stones–complemented by a soothing water feature–is mirrored in a reflecting pond. The final touch is a cozy fireplace and cushy furniture that you can sink into.

The majority of plantings in this garden are evergreen so you have a very textural and abundant array of visual interest year round, not just in the spring and summer. After all, romance is for all seasons!”

Why it Works

To me there are three key features that make this design so attractive and functional;

1. Use of Negative Space 

It would have been so easy to add more plants or an extravagant fountain into the pool. Or maybe a few large planted containers on the patio and baskets hanging from the pergola. Yet the essence of this design is all about restraint. Leaving open the expanse of water and allowing the naked architecture of the vaulted pergola to be seen creates uncluttered ‘negative space’. This becomes a visual break allowing focus to be on the clean lines and contrasting textures of natural materials. For the homeowner this translates to a feeling of meditative peacefulness and tranquility rather than over-stimulation.

2. Restraint in Color and Plant Palettes

IMG_0880

A green and white monochromatic color scheme is always elegant but Karen’s design goes beyond elegant to timeless. She achieves this by focusing primarily on foliage. There are many evergreen trees and shrubs in this vignette with contorted pines playing an important role as they drape gracefully over boulders and fallen logs as well as gracing the pergola itself.

IMG_0743 White hellebores and cyclamen  add floral interest nestled among deer ferns and salal but the planting design is not centered around them.

3. Understanding scale

IMG_0739

This is one of the hardest design criteria to understand and why working with a professional can be so helpful. Notice how Karen balances the hefty timbers of the pergola with bold but clean lined  furniture. How the substantial fireplace anchors the back wall yet is not imposing. How the tall conifers and specimen paper bark maple (seen in the top photo) balance the height of the structure. Every detail  feels ‘right’.

The final details

A subtle secondary water feature

A subtle  water feature adds sound and movement

In truth one could teach a full landscape design class from this garden so trying to sum it up in a few paragraphs is challenging but these are some of the other features I see as hallmarks of Karen’s work

1. Combining textures; soft pine needles brushing against rough, weathered stone. The peeling bark of the paperbark maple set against the smooth planed wood of the pergola. A swathe of round river rocks cutting through square pavers

2. Repetition; the furniture, mantel and chandelier all speak to the same design aesthetic as the pergola itself. Clusters of fat white candles have been used throughout the space for romantic lighting (Lanterns might have introduced a new and unnecessary design element)

3. The unexpected; a trickle of water from the pergola roof drips into a swale of river rocks, the droplets merging and slowly making their way across the patio and into the pool.

Karen is an exceptional designer and is no stranger to awards at the show. This year she once again received a gold medal as well as receiving the Sunset Western Living Award and the 425 Magazine Editors’ Choice Award.

Congratulations also go to colleagues Steve Spear of Complete Landscape Inc for the installation and Bill Ellsbury of Moon Shadows Landscape Lighting.

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon
SUBSCRIBE





Table Top Pots – Perfect for Holiday Gifts

The Nativity Scene was re-organized daily by Katie! 1991

The Nativity Scene was re-organized daily by Katie age 3 1/2

When our children were small and the budget was tight we made all our Christmas gifts, cards and even tags. I would start many weeks ahead of time, the sewing machine working late into the night as I made matching flannel shirts for my husband and son (then 2 1/2 years old) and a Beatrix Potter duvet cover for our daughter.

My husband and son back in 1994 with their matching shirts

My husband and son back in 1993 with their matching shirts

 

 

The kitchen would be filled with spicy aromas as I steamed home-made Christmas puddings to be wrapped in red cellophane and cooked up dozens of mince pies. Cards were crafted from folded fabric one year, lino-cut block another.

Always the comedian - Paul hangs his own ornament on the tree. 1994

Always the comedian – Paul hangs his own ornament on the tree. 1994

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even the Christmas stockings, nativity scene and large wall hanging-style advent calendar were stitched with love. In hindsight I wonder how I ever did it all!

Twenty or so years have gone past – life got busier, budgets eased and we were able to give ‘bigger’ gifts. It was so much fun to be able to go to the store and select something special for friends and family. Home-made Christmas decorations mingled with shiny new baubles and trinkets discovered at specialty stores.

The children are now adults, our daughter  married  with a home of her own and we seem to have come full circle. I still enjoy the festive atmosphere at the shopping mall – in small doses! But I much prefer to be at home, carols playing, log fire burning and filling the home once again with the smells of Christmas. A few beautiful, specially chosen gifts share space under the tree with homemade items.

Each piece made with love by my husband Andy

Each piece made with love by my husband Andy

Special ornaments are still purchased and exchanged on Christmas eve but  we also wait to see what beautiful designs my husband has handturned on his woodworking lathe, each piece crafted with  love and sure to be treasured for a lifetime.

Today it’s less about budget than about choice. We understand the value of giving the gift of time.

So to help you create a special gift I’ve got a few design ideas for quick table top containers for inside and outside the home. Once you’ve assembled the materials they take only minutes to put together.

1. The Miniature Christmas Tree

A 10" diameter outdoor container - color all year

A 10″ diameter outdoor container – color all year

Materials

Frost resistant container approx 10″ x 10″ with drainage hole

Potting soil

1 x 4″ Alberta spruce or other conifer

1 x 4″ berried wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens)

1 x 4″ bugleweed (Ajuga repens)

2 x 4″ golden creeping Jenny (Lysimachia n. ‘Aurea’)

 

Putting it together

Add potting soil directly to pot – no crocks at the bottom

Add plants and tuck soil into gaps

Water until it drains through hole at base

Optional – finish with a pretty red bow

Where to keep it

Outdoors in sun or shade for winter, part sun in summer

 

2. The Woodland Pot

7" diamater woodland pot for a covered porch

7″ diamater woodland pot for a covered porch

Materials

7 or 8″ diameter birch bark pot with liner but no drainage hole

Charcoal (buy in small bags from a nursery)

Potting soil

1 x 4″ Alberta spruce or other conifer

1 x 4″ flowering hellebore e.g. Jacob

1 x 4″ berried wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens)

1 x 4″ Emerald Gaiety euonymus (Euonymus .f ‘Emerald Gaiety’)

Moss to finish

Optional; wired bow and glittered stems

 

Putting it all together

Add 1/2″ charcoal to base of pot.

Carefully add potting soil

Plant up as shown adding soil into gaps

Add decorative items

Finish by adding moss to hide soil

Water just enough just to moisten the soil. The charcoal will absorb some excess and stop smells. Do not overwater

Where to keep it

Outside on a covered porch where it will not receive direct rain. (Can be brought inside for a few hours)

3. A Fresh Look

A Fresh Look - try a cyclamen over a poinsettia

A Fresh Look – try a cyclamen over a poinsettia

Materials

7-8″ diameter burgundy metal container with liner and no drainage hole

Charcoal

Potting soil

1 x 4″ Normandy pine

1 x 4″ Pepperonia plant

1 x 4″ button plant

1 x 4″ cyclamen

1 x 2″ ivy

Moss

Optional; wired bow and berry accents

Putting it all together

Assemble as per woodland container BUT keep cyclamen in plastic pot

Water as for the woodland container but remove the cyclamen and set it on a saucer of water then allow to drain before replacing it in container.

Where to keep it

Indoors in a cool location.

 

An invitation

Join me for one of my Holiday Container Workshops on December 6th  and make memories as well as a unique container. The log fire will be burning, Holiday music playing softly in the background, warm, homemade English mincepies and a glass of bubbly to enjoy and a few hours to step away from the busyness of the season.

There are two workshops to choose from but spaces are filling up quickly. For more details and to register click HERE.

Here are just a few photos from one of the workshops last year.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Enjoy this season of giving by giving a little of yourself.

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon
SUBSCRIBE





And the winner is….

 

If you didn’t win, don’t worry! I have a special consolation prize for you. For this week ONLY I will discount my class for you if you sign up from this post. Just click on the the photo below to get 25% OFF!

 

SORRY – but MY special discount has now expired. However you may still enroll in the class  – and sometimes Craftsy offers it’s OWN discount!! Click on the image below for more details and get up to 50% off!!

 

titleCard I’ll see you in the garden

 

Foliage & Focal Points – and a GIVEAWAY!

IMG_5980 When you look out into the garden what do you see? Is there something specific that catches your eye or do you find yourself just scanning the horizon? In our excitement to add plants to the garden it is easy to forget that a garden without distinct focal points can be unimaginative at best and boring at worst. Thankfully this is easy to correct even if you have already overstuffed your garden with your favorite perennials and shrubs.

Over the next few weeks I’m going to show you four different elements you can use as a focal point; water features, garden art, structures and containers – many are inexpensive, some you may already have gathering dust in the garden shed. There is one theme we will come back to every time though and that is the use of foliage to enhance our chosen focal point, so that seems like a good place to start.

Why foliage? What about flowers?

The simple fact is that flowers only bloom for a relatively short time. Even my whirling butterflies (Gaura) seen above only blooms from mid June until late September and that is one of the most floriferous plants in my garden. If I rely on those flowers for year round interest I am going to be disappointed.

On the other hand there are many  trees, shrubs and perennials that have beautiful leaves from early spring until late fall, often changing hue through the seasons and of course there are also many evergreens from magnolia trees and conifers to lavender and many grasses which keep their leaves year round. If we use foliage as a frame for our focal point we will always have something special to look at. In my front garden shown above I have dwarf conifers, silver wormwood (Artemisia), lavender, thyme, parahebe, daphne and more.

But I want COLOR!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I’ve got good news – foliage comes in every shape, size, color and pattern imaginable so color is not a problem. From the spots and splashes on drooping fetterbush (Leucothoe) to the multi-hued heavenly bamboo (Nandina),  every shade of green and blue-green offered by conifers and the endless offerings of Heuchera and Heucherella (gold, cinnamon, black, purple, lime, orange, pink, peach, silver, green and more) your garden has no excuse to look drab.

How do I use foliage with my focal point?

Think of a picture frame – that’s the role foliage plays. It will typically either surround your piece or act as a backdrop Got you thinking? Well I have exciting news for you.

Next week (September 9th) will be the launch of my online class for Craftsy;

GORGEOUS GARDEN DESIGN – Foliage & Focal Points.

This is a 7 part class that will dive into this very topic in depth. You’ll walk around my garden and several others as I share ideas and we explore not only what you can use as a focal point but also how to link them together to create a garden. These classes are SUCH good value. In fact they cost less than just a one hour design consultation!

You can also watch the class at your leisure – your access never expries, so if you need to get up and put the kettle on or pour another glass of wine I’ll wait for you. Craftsy is a very interactive platform too. You can post questions and photographs as well as discuss ideas and projects with your fellow students.

My free gift to you

Click on my photo to enter to win my class!

Click on this photo and enter to win my class!

By way of thanking you for following my blog I’m giving away ONE FREE CLASS & A SIGNED COPY OF MY AWARD WINNING BOOK ‘FINE FOLIAGE’ ! Just click on my photo above to enter.

A winner will be selected at random on the day my class goes live; Tuesday September 9th, when you will be notified by email. Craftsy will set you up for your free class and I’ll mail you my book. (Note; sadly this giveaway is only available to residents of the USA and Canada but everyone will be eligible for my ‘runners-up’ prize mentioned below…)

I’ll have a nice commiseration prize for everyone else – but you’ll have to read my next blog post  (9/16) to find out what that is! And in case you are wondering the examples I’ll share in my Craftsy class will be unique – everything on my blog will be bonus material.

Good luck – I’ll see you in my garden

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon
SUBSCRIBE