Celebrate with Me – and Enter to Win!

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Hot off the FedEx truck!

I am thrilled to be able to announce that my new book Gardening with Foliage First (Timber Press), co-authored with Christina Salwitz is finally HERE!

Why do you need this book?

The beauty of flowers is seductive, but flowers, by their fleeting nature, are a fickle base to provide long-lasting gardens with year-round interest. Tackle this problem with the advice in Gardening with Foliage First. Learn how to first build a framework of foliage and then layer in flowers and other artistic elements to add the finishing touches. This simple, recipe-style approach to garden design will work for a variety of climates and garden challenges, including deer, dry shade, and more.

How is it organized?

Color-coded pages makes finding what you need easy

Color-coded pages makes finding what you need easy: green for spring& summer, orange for fall & winter

By season (spring/summer) and light requirements (sun/shade), each color coded to help you quickly find what you need.

At the start of each section is an index of the fun combinations. Aren’t you curious to find our more about The Ticklish Porcupine on p270?

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Taking a cue from the layout of our award-winning book Fine Foliage, we  wanted to be sure to explain both why the combination works as a descriptive caption under the main beauty shot, but additionally ‘how the design grows‘ over time. Here’s one example:

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You will also notice that we include helpful details about each of the plants in the Foliage Framework as well as the flower, bark, berry or art piece that acts as the Finishing Touch. That will help you copy our ideas or use them as a springboard to substitute something similar.

Does it only have ideas for the Pacific Northwest?

Of course not! We traveled from British Columbia to Arizona and Florida to Pennsylvania in addition to scouting  local gardens.

Winter inspiration from the Denver Botanical Garden

Winter inspiration from the Denver Botanical Garden

Christina and I are passionate about sharing our insights and knowledge – be sure to take time to read the introduction to gain a better understanding of the attributes that make a plant pairing sing rather than sulk.

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An excerpt from the introduction

 

What do the pros say?

Christina and I were honored and humbled that the uber-talented author and designer Tracy DiSabato-Aust wrote a review of our new book. My copy of her classic text The Well-Designed Mixed Garden (Timber Press) is so well thumbed I may need a replacement soon! Here’s what she said about Gardening with Foliage First:

“Karen and Christina knock one out of the park with exceptional ideas for everything from large landscapes to tiny patios and containers.”

Where can I buy a copy?

By the end of this month it will be available in

But if you can’t wait that long or would like a signed copy you can get one right NOW! Thanks to the nice Mr. FedEx man  have 200 copies just ready to send your way. I ship by USPS 2-3 day Priority mail with tracking, anywhere within the USA.

Just $24.95 (+ shipping) with credit card or PayPal. You can even request a special personalisation during the ordering process (what a great gift!):




Win a signed copy! (Now closed)

And what’s a new book release without sharing the joy? If you’d like to enter to win a signed copy just leave a comment below telling me your favorite foliage plant. (Comments left on social media posts will not count – comments must be left on this blog post).

Competition will close at 9am PST Tuesday January 17th 2017 and the winning name  drawn using a random number generator. Good luck!

And the winner is…

Thank you to all who entered and left comments with great ideas. The WINNER is…. KAREN MILLER!

Congratulations Karen, I have sent you an email.

For those that didn’t win a free copy I do you hope will consider purchasing one and would love it if you left a short review on Amazon when you have time.

 

Thanks again everyone – happy gardening!

 

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232 Comments

  1. Susan Cunningham on January 9, 2017 at 5:16 pm

    At the moment, variegated iris are my favorite. Their green and white vertical leaves are still poking out of the snow as I write in my Zone 7 garden. Loved your first book! Can’t wait to see the latest!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 5:37 pm

      Thank you Susan! I love those iris also; Iris pallida ‘Aureovariegata’ looks fabulous with variegated lemon thyme running through its base and those fragrant blue flowers are gorgeous. Good luck!



    • Deborah Johnson on January 10, 2017 at 5:31 pm

      Love coral bells and switch grasses



  2. Sharla Hill on January 9, 2017 at 5:20 pm

    I love Nandina!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 5:37 pm

      Me too ; Just bought five Gulf Stream for a client this morning in fact. Good luck!



  3. Jill Macaulay on January 9, 2017 at 5:25 pm

    My favourite foliage plants are hostas but alone they can be boring so I mix them with heucheras and ferns and groundcovers. I love all different shapes of leaves and variegations.
    I have your first book and would love a copy of Foliage First.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 5:39 pm

      Well good luck Jill! I especially like really delicate ferns with hosta – Himalayan maidenhair fern (Adiantum venustem) is a favorite and being evergreen it holds the space over winter too



  4. Tiffany Gieser on January 9, 2017 at 5:27 pm

    Congratulations, Karen!!! Can’t wait to get my hands on a copy. I’ve learned so much from you. My favorite foliage plant is one I’ve actually had perennial success with in my large container gardens: Canna Tropicanna . When the sun shines through the leaves they positively glow!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 5:40 pm

      You’re so encouraging Tiffany – thank you. I love that PURPLE is even visible when those Canna leaves are backlit. Stunning. Good luck!



  5. Shonelle on January 9, 2017 at 5:31 pm

    My favorite foliage plant is vinca minor. A dense covering of dark green gives the perfect background to brighter greens, like cypress, and it does a great job of smothering weeds.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 5:41 pm

      HI Shonelle; give the variegated for a try. the white margins add a little light in those shady areas where it thrives. Good luck with the giveaway!



  6. joni boyer on January 9, 2017 at 5:34 pm

    In my shady urban garden, the benefits of striking foliage are everywhere. One stand-out example are the many epimediums that grace all areas, partnered with various hostas and ferns, elegant in their bearing and their colouring for three seasons (sometimes even longer!).



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 5:42 pm

      I so agree; love the lavender flowers of Lilafee Epimedium with purple toned foliage such as Heuchera and Japanese painted fern. Good luck!



  7. Cathi Lamoreux on January 9, 2017 at 5:39 pm

    My current favorite foliage is hebe, but sadly I can’t grow it in my zone. I love my epimediums, ferns and oak leaf hydrangeas for great, long lasting foliage.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 5:43 pm

      Feel your frustration – I can manage hebe Quicksilver in a mild winter but probably wont make it this year here in Duvall. I still buy small ones for annual containers though. Good luck!



  8. susanne dubois on January 9, 2017 at 5:50 pm

    Heuchera Citronelle is my favorite at the moment (I am very fickle). I love the way it brightens up the darkest corner of my garden. I was inspired by your first book…it made me realize that foliage can be much more interesting than flowers over the long haul.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 5:52 pm

      Fickle is good 🙂 So glad you enjoyed our first book – I know you’ll LOVE this one! Good luck Susanne



  9. Monika Zmetana on January 9, 2017 at 5:51 pm

    Zone 2 and always looking for something new. I use hostas, ferns and grasses. I enjoyed taking your class online and reading your posts.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 5:53 pm

      Yikes is there life in zone 2??!! I can’t even imagine that level of cold! So glad I have been able to give you some ideas Monika – good luck!



  10. Michelle Blakeslee on January 9, 2017 at 5:53 pm

    My favorite foliage plant is Heuchera. I use it in pots, in the ground… in sun, in shade. There are so many cool cultivars to choose from. Close runner up is Carex for all the same reasons. Flowers have their place but can be way over rated!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 6:04 pm

      You’ll love that we have included a special Heuchera Hot List in this book, with recommendations for different climates from the Heuchera guru Dan Heims. Good luck with the giveaway!



  11. Sheila Rowan on January 9, 2017 at 6:06 pm

    I live in Florida, zone 11. We have an abundance of exotic foliage but my favorite is the crotons, especially the one that has long green leaves splashed with yellow, called “Sloppy Painter”



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 6:12 pm

      Ooh I haven’t seen that one. I do like Zanzibar – sort of a Jackson Pollock bad hair day! Good luck!



  12. Robin on January 9, 2017 at 6:10 pm

    I have a big crush on Mae-jima Daphne at the moment. ????



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 6:13 pm

      I won’t tell anyone 🙂 That looks fabulous with golden yew and red/gold coleus…..just sayin’! Thanks for your support – good luck!



  13. Robin Wyll on January 9, 2017 at 6:13 pm

    My favorite foliage plant is Gunnera manicata!!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 6:33 pm

      That’s some serious foliage!! Good luck!



  14. Kathy Tygart on January 9, 2017 at 6:14 pm

    My absolute favorite is Rainbow Leucothoe. Beautiful Burgundy highlights to the variegated foliage in the winter months.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 6:34 pm

      That’s a favorite of both Christina and I too – we use it in the landscape and containers. Mercifully ignored by deer



  15. Michaele Anderson on January 9, 2017 at 6:18 pm

    I guess this time of year, I can get mesmerized by heuchera ‘Fire Alarm’ when it is planted in a container and is backlit by the sun. It can stop me in my tracks when it looks positively ablaze.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 6:35 pm

      Oh we are easily mesmerized by foliage – and that is a stunner. In fact we have used it in this book…. Just sayin’!



  16. Ashley Potchynok on January 9, 2017 at 6:19 pm

    I love anything variegated! They add a lot of visual interest to both shade and sunny gardens! I would someday love to have a variegated Japanese maple! Very excited for your new book!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 6:36 pm

      Oh me too! I’m like a magpie – anything shiny or colorful. I don’t have a variegated maple as such (although there is at least one I can remember in this book) but I do like Purple Ghost and the way the veins stand out in spring. Good luck with the giveaway!



  17. Cindy on January 9, 2017 at 6:40 pm

    I adore the large, bold, texture of Rodgersia leaves!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:00 pm

      YESSSS – love those that emerge bronze especially such as Rotlaub!



  18. Valerie Sikkema on January 9, 2017 at 6:41 pm

    Rhus Tiger Eyes is my favourite foliage plant in my garden.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:01 pm

      Yup – got that one in a container by the patio. Even my husband notices it!



      • Valerie Sikkema on January 10, 2017 at 10:19 am

        My husband loves it too – even leafless in the winter it has interesting form which makes it stand out. Congratulations on your book, I am looking forward to getting a copy!



  19. Amy Lapsley on January 9, 2017 at 6:41 pm

    Thanks for this post Karen!! I have been waiting for the release of your new book with anticipation! My favourite foliage plant is Japanese Forest Grass because it is lively and brightens up shady areas. Thanks for your inspirational books!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:02 pm

      Thanks for your kind words and encouragement Amy! I love the waterfall effect of that grass – so do the rabbits sadly! Good luck!



  20. Sally anne Sadler on January 9, 2017 at 6:57 pm

    I love maiden hair ferns. Every spring, on hikes, in my garden…Just love “em.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:02 pm

      Totally agree – I have the western maidenhair fern with quilted hostas – delicious



  21. Michael Crawford on January 9, 2017 at 6:58 pm

    Eskimo Sunset Maple, it is beautiful!!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:03 pm

      Sure is – would love to know what you’ve paired it with: post a photo sometime on our Facebook page (www.facebook/finefoliage)



  22. Patsy Bell Hobson on January 9, 2017 at 7:05 pm

    Coleus. I love coleus because there is a color, size and texture variety to fit into every gardening theme or style.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:15 pm

      You’re so right – even sun-tolerant varieties!



  23. Karen Miller on January 9, 2017 at 7:11 pm

    I love Heuchera plants! Congrats Karen!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:15 pm

      You’re singing our song….



  24. bev on January 9, 2017 at 7:13 pm

    My favorite foliage plant is Acer shirasawanum, for the non-palmatum leaves and the awesome fall color!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:17 pm

      Yes, I have TWO! Fabulous addition to my woodland garden



  25. Idelle on January 9, 2017 at 7:15 pm

    I love Thyme, because it’s beautiful, comes in lots of varieties, smells wonderful and can be used in cooking!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:17 pm

      Even in soggy Seattle soils we manage a few varieties of thyme – great plant



  26. Craig on January 9, 2017 at 7:16 pm

    I have seen some wonderful ideas for foliage on your site and have used many in the garden, but my favorite is my peacock fern in a hanging pot. The cool blue is a nice contrast to the summer heat. I almost lost it last winter but am doing better by it this time around.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:18 pm

      That’s a new one to me – thanks for sharing!



  27. Maureen on January 9, 2017 at 7:20 pm

    Uh oh, I’m to pick one?! Ok … my favorite is hostajunipercypressmagnolia. 😀
    I use all kinds of plants, and love forcing branches, as well.
    Congratulations on your book, looks beautiful and inspiring!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:23 pm

      Too funny – clearly another plantaholic! Good luck~



  28. Allison Foster on January 9, 2017 at 7:22 pm

    Congratulations!!! Your book looks to be a wealth of knowledge! My favorite foliage although simple as it may be is coleous. I love how easy it is to grow, the variety of colors and of course it’s best characteristic in my humble opinion is how easy and fun it is to root from cuttings!!!! So anyone can multiply it infinetly, spreading through out the garden, Containers, sharing with friends & family and when fall cones around me it gets to chilly for coleous to survive you can simply looking off a branch and bring it in to root for spring!!! ????????????????????????????????????????????????☮



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:24 pm

      Thanks Allison! Fun how coleus have come back into fashion isn’t it? Good luck with the giveaway!



  29. Barb Husted on January 9, 2017 at 7:44 pm

    My favorite foliage plant are hellebores. They are so dinosauric (is that a word?) with their sawtooth leaves. And with the bonus of flowers that bloom all winter long they draw attention. They are suited to the shady north sides and they tolerate the cold.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 7:49 pm

      YES! Pink Frost is one of my favorites but there are so many to choose from. Good luck!



  30. Karen on January 9, 2017 at 8:01 pm

    My current favorite is a choisia (spelling) that I just planted in my Seattle garden.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 8:02 pm

      Love that one – especially Choisya ternata ‘Sundance’ with its golden leaves. Looks fabulous next to Mahonia ‘Charity’ to echo the yellow flowers. Good luck!



  31. Paulette H. on January 9, 2017 at 8:19 pm

    I love hostas! Their infinite color variety can be magic in shady areas!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 8:36 pm

      Absolutely!



  32. Jessica Greenwood on January 9, 2017 at 8:25 pm

    I love chartreuse foliage against dark purple/red foliage. My conscious memory of being stopped in my tracks by this combination was of lemon and black lace elderberry. I see it everywhere, flowering plum against bamboo, copertina Ninebark and Sundance Mexican orange… dark star Eucomis against a magic carpet spirea…



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 8:37 pm

      You’ll love this book then Jessica – good luck!



  33. rvmk on January 9, 2017 at 8:37 pm

    I’m very drawn to melianthes major. Love how it fills in a sunny corner of my garden and how the sharp-toothed leaves lend a tropical look to the space.



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 8:38 pm

      Ooh yes – I love that in my summer containers. Too cold here for long term. Good choice!



      • rvmk on January 9, 2017 at 8:44 pm

        I’ve had this one (in Tacoma) for five or six years, but it may not survive the hard freezes that this winter has presented. If it doesn’t make it, I’ll replace it again (which I’ve done twice in 15 or so years).



  34. rvmk on January 9, 2017 at 8:40 pm

    … but also love huecheras and coleus and a zillion others.



  35. Jeanne Cronce on January 9, 2017 at 8:45 pm

    This is a hard choice! But I have to say my favorite right now is coleus. You can find many colors and variations and some for shade and finally..for sun!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 10:26 pm

      Your garden is full of gorgeous foliage Jeanne!



  36. Eveline Young on January 9, 2017 at 9:29 pm

    A Favorite foliage plant is hard, all foliage plants are so much fun to combine for texture and color. One favorite is Caladiums used as an annual, big wow factor! Looking forward to the book!



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 10:27 pm

      Love them for shade containers in summer Eveline – good luck



  37. Kathy Juracek on January 9, 2017 at 9:47 pm

    I love all the Heuchera’s, Fern’s and Croton Petra !



    • Karen Chapman on January 9, 2017 at 10:28 pm

      Love to see what you create Kathy – good luck



  38. Karen Bonoff on January 9, 2017 at 10:49 pm

    Enjoy looking at my Fatsia japonica ‘spider web’ leaves light up the shade neath my big ol apple tree. Your first book, Fine Foliage, is an inspiration…Foliage First looks to have the same effect!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:14 am

      We think you’ll love the seasonal layout as well as the ‘How it Grows’ section of this new book – plus its TWICE as big!



  39. Michelle on January 9, 2017 at 11:08 pm

    Brachyglottis greyi (daisy bush) and ponytails grass, they are both gorgeous and so easy to care for/neglect 🙂 I loved Fine Foliage, looking forward to the new book! I had my first baby last May and missed a whole season of gardening, very excited to get my hands in the dirt in 2017 and get some new plants! I am slowly converting my flower heavy beds to a more balanced foliage design.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:15 am

      Congratulations on all of the above!!



  40. Mette Larsen on January 10, 2017 at 12:38 am

    Hello from Denmark 🙂 I follow Fine Foliage on facebook – thank you for sharing all those inspiring pictures. And congratulations on your new book.
    My favorite (one of them) is Brunnera macrophylla Jack Frost – it’s such a beautiful ground cover in light shade.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:17 am

      Well hello Mette! Thank you for your support and encouragement. Love to hear we both grow Jack Frost. Such a great performer isn’t it?



  41. Vicki Katz on January 10, 2017 at 2:01 am

    I love burgundy wine dwarf Nandina. I hope the rabbits leave them alone!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:17 am

      Let me know Vicki! The deer get to mine before the rabbits have a chance….



  42. Kateryna Martyniuk on January 10, 2017 at 2:29 am

    Hello from Ukraine. I like Sambucus Nigra “Black Lace ” as folliage plant and of course many others like Japanese ferns. Black Lace looks fantastic combined with grasses and when it has light background.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:18 am

      So wonderful to be getting these international friends commenting and to hear we grow the same things in our garden! Love your ideas



  43. Semeniuc Anna on January 10, 2017 at 3:05 am

    I’m realy in love with conifers for their unchangeable form, interesting colours and something more then said… But even more I’m impressed by the unrepeatable seasonal changes of japanese maples with their changeable beauty and constant changing of a colour throughout the year…



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:19 am

      Conifers and maples are classics aren’t they?



      • Semeniuc Anna on January 10, 2017 at 10:04 am

        Sure, exactly like my favorite combination of red maples with golden leaf hakonechloa. Its classics but it always will attract our attention)))



  44. Elena Troyan on January 10, 2017 at 4:58 am

    Hi from Ukraine! My favorite plant is fraxinella. It not only has delicate feathery leaves, but the amazing raspberry-pink flowers, floating like a butterfly over the delicate bush. The plant exudes a wonderful lemon-smoky flavor. This is ether fragrance. In bright sunny weather, touch a flower is dangerous, its leaves can leave burns. It’s a proud beauty. He says: “Admire me from afar, I am gorgeous”



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:22 am

      I had to look that one up. In England we called it burning bush which is a common name for several plants. In the US it is known as gas plant. The botanical name is Dictamnus alba for curious readers



  45. Jill Stevens on January 10, 2017 at 6:43 am

    I love Heuchera.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:22 am

      I’m with you!



  46. Jay Sifford on January 10, 2017 at 6:52 am

    Without a doubt: chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Curly Tops’. It looks like a big ole blue brillo pad!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:23 am

      Yes I love that one – and Baby Blue. Can’t resist stroking that great conifer!



  47. Jill Wennmaker on January 10, 2017 at 8:40 am

    Caladiums- love all the colors and patterns!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:24 am

      Wish we had more choice here. I buy them as houseplants and use them in summer shade pots – love them



  48. Karen VanSydenborgh on January 10, 2017 at 9:08 am

    I love my Logistics and the contrast of the Japanese Iris leaves next to it.
    Your book looks amazing!



    • Karen VanSydenborgh on January 10, 2017 at 9:09 am

      Gotta love auto correct!
      Ligularia! Not logistics!



      • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:25 am

        You did have me wondering…..! Ligularia is a great foliage plant and we have included at least one fabulous combo using it in our new book



  49. Pamela Carter on January 10, 2017 at 9:12 am

    Acer aconitifolium for its striking fall color, Cercis canadensis ‘Rising Sun’ for spring and summer foliage, Ligularia ‘Britt Marie Crawford’ for deer resistant red large leaves. I guess you will need to add me among those who couldn’t settle with just one favorite!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:26 am

      Ha ha – yes we are addicts 🙂 Love all your suggestions and often include that maple in clients designs



  50. Michele Walker on January 10, 2017 at 9:24 am

    Congrats on the new book and pending granddaughter! 2 wonderful arrivals! Sciadopitys verticillata



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:27 am

      Thank you! A great conifer



  51. Michelle Miller on January 10, 2017 at 9:26 am

    I do not know where I’d be without Hakonechloa. It’s a winner every time I use it and clients love it. Congratulations on your second book! My copy of fine FOLIAGE is always within reach. Thank you!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:29 am

      Thanks for your enthusiasm Michelle! Good luck with the giveaway



  52. Liz Omura on January 10, 2017 at 9:56 am

    Good morning! This past fall I was enjoying Mukdenia rossi ‘Karasuba’. The foliage really shines in the autumn but is lovely all summer too. Im hoping it’s happy where it’s at and returns for me this spring!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 10:29 am

      Stunning choice!



  53. Kathy Sturr on January 10, 2017 at 10:19 am

    My favorite foliage plants — because of course, I can’t choose just one — and we’ll keep it to plants, not shrubs, not trees because my pea brain would be overwhelmed — are rhubarbs (I’m pining for an ornamental), horse radish (because those leaves are downright tropical in Z4), and Ligularias (BECAUSE!).



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 10:29 am

      Never thought of growing horseradish – wonder if the deer would leave it alone>



  54. Lana Hood on January 10, 2017 at 10:30 am

    My favorite foliage plants are of the grass variety.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 10:52 am

      Love grasses – Panicum ‘Shenandoah’ is a favorite for me



  55. Cathy Tutten on January 10, 2017 at 11:16 am

    I think little devil ninebark is an awesome addition to a garden!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 11:23 am

      small enough for a container too!



  56. Susan on January 10, 2017 at 11:36 am

    Just look at all those responses! I think you are in the big time now! Loved reading all the favorites. I have so many and right now it kind of depends on which way I’m looking as other than houseplants inside, conifers are about the only noticeable foliage outside! Tough to pick one favorite right? A small favorite of mine is European Ginger, Asarum europeaeum.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 12:08 pm

      Conifers are the workhorses of the winter garden – love the way several change color at this time of year. European ginger is a great, evergreen groundcover for shade – fun choice!



      • Susan on January 10, 2017 at 1:08 pm

        One type of conifer I love are the deciduous conifers (Larix, Taxodium and Metasequoia). Love their change of color and winter branch structure. Plus they are just soft and fun to touch.



  57. Rhonda on January 10, 2017 at 12:30 pm

    I love the colour-coded pages! Why I need this book? I have a large yard with three old trees (spruce & 2 maples) and two new trees (maples with RED foliage in fall!) planted in the fall 2016. Half of my yard is garden and the perimeter is naked. I’d love to learn more about foliage plants before filling in the perimeter. I just started growing coleus. It is gorgeous. I’m overwintering one pot indoors and if it makes it, it will be planted outside again this year. I love gardening!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:01 pm

      Good luck with the giveaway Rhonda – sounds like the perfect book for you!



  58. Sharmin on January 10, 2017 at 12:31 pm

    I loved your first book and would love a copy of this one. It’s hard to pick a favorite, but looking at the current garden, I will pick 2, a grass and a conifer, both of which provide interest to my small garden all year long. 1. Miscanthus sinesis ‘Morning light’ – the see through quality and upright form all year, and continuing to provide interest now in the dead of winter by remaining upright and with the wonderful tan seedheads. 2. Pinus mugo ‘Carsten’s Wintergold’ – nice green small dwarf to provide contrast against other plants all year, and shines in the winter garden by turning bright yellow.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:05 pm

      NICE! Love frozen Miscanthus….



  59. Deborah Sherwood on January 10, 2017 at 1:14 pm

    My favorite plant is heucheras! They look good year around and provide a rainbow of color.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:06 pm

      A popular winner



  60. Jillian Too on January 10, 2017 at 1:43 pm

    I like the Plantain Lily. It sounds like a wonderful book.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:06 pm

      Thanks Jillian – good luck!



  61. Rebecca Christie on January 10, 2017 at 3:52 pm

    That’s such a difficult question to answer! I love Hepatica foliage. I also love the delicacy of Thalictrum leaves.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:07 pm

      Pretty! So fern-like isn’t it?



  62. Jeanette Barney on January 10, 2017 at 3:56 pm

    Heucheras live all winter long, even under ice and snow. I find that amazing!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:08 pm

      Totally! We have a special Heuchera Hot List in this book just for you!



  63. Paula Leier-Engelhardt on January 10, 2017 at 4:17 pm

    I live and garden in a shady, damp woods in Wisconsin, and have found hostas and ferns great companions to the natives in our gardens. I would love to find out about other options.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:08 pm

      We have some neat ideas for you in the book



  64. Renee Rousseau on January 10, 2017 at 4:25 pm

    Today the Swamp sunflower is my favorite because of it’s color and size. Winter in MD so I have to be satisfied with my yellow kitchen walls and my orange tree seedlings!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:09 pm

      Love your determination!! Good luck



  65. Brian Smith on January 10, 2017 at 4:25 pm

    Love hen and chicks for my rock garden!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:09 pm

      There are some interesting new ones that change color called Chick Charms – watch out for them!



  66. Jennifer on January 10, 2017 at 4:32 pm

    Favorite foliage plant in my zone 7b Atlanta garden is Hydrangea quercifolia, hands down!

    Really like the premise of this book and would love to win a copy. Thanks!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:10 pm

      Thanks for entering – good luck!



  67. Wesley Ford on January 10, 2017 at 4:36 pm

    I am partial to Leucothoe as a great evergreen foliage shrub. I find both ‘Scarleta’ and ‘Giralds Rainbow’ to be great selections for a variety situations in the landscape. I also use the foliage for greening floral arrangements year round, but especially at Christmas.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:10 pm

      And the deer ignore it too Wesley!



  68. Mary on January 10, 2017 at 4:43 pm

    In my WI woodland shade garden, foliage texture is a necessity. My go to are ferns, especially athyriums, which range from natuve to painted to Dre’s



    • Mary on January 10, 2017 at 4:51 pm

      Dagger to Frizzelliae, Dryopteris, sweet Oak Ferns along with Brunnera and hostas, wild ginger.
      (Sorry. Hit send before completing).



      • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:11 pm

        Oh have we got some droolworthy combos for YOU in this book!!



        • Mary on January 10, 2017 at 7:29 pm

          I look forward to finding out!! Fortunate to have native p. carex, ladyslippers, trillium, bloodroot, and other ephemerals covering most of the site with zig zag goldenrod and aster later. But have enhanced the side and front with textures to enjoy all season!



  69. Larienne Weber on January 10, 2017 at 4:47 pm

    Congratulations to both of you on the release of your latest book! Fine Foliage is fantastic and I’m looking forward to checking this one out.
    This was such a difficult choice, but I’m going with rosemary, which I have in various forms scattered throughout the garden. I appreciate the fine, dark greenery all year and they play such a great support role to a lot of different foliage and flowers.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:12 pm

      OK am officially jealous. Christina can grow rosemary. Mine is TOAST after freezing rain, ice and snow.



  70. Linda G on January 10, 2017 at 5:08 pm

    Viburnum x bodnantense or V. farreri – love the look and fragrance.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:12 pm

      I think viburnums are such an under-rated shrub don’t you? Good luck with the giveaway



  71. Sandy Zimmer on January 10, 2017 at 5:28 pm

    I love hostas and heucheras. There are so many different colors of heucheras!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:45 pm

      There certainly are Sandy!



  72. Jeanne Traeger on January 10, 2017 at 5:40 pm

    Since moving to Texas 5 years ago, I have become a big fan of plumbago, which fills my front flower beds. Most flowering shrubs are in bloom for just a few weeks at most. My plumbagos bloom through the entire season and have even made it through winters in which we did not have a hard freeze in Austin. In addition, they do not require much watering – wonderful foliage plants for sure!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:45 pm

      Amazing – and so jealous!!!



  73. Marci on January 10, 2017 at 5:40 pm

    Peace Lily Plant



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 5:46 pm

      Good luck Marci!



  74. Nancy Stedman on January 10, 2017 at 6:18 pm

    My favorite foliage plant is carex ‘Silk Tassel.’ It is variegated but the white is subtle and the overall effect is of silver. The plant provides a beautiful airy, almost other-worldly, quality to the garden.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:53 pm

      I’ll have to look for that one! Looks beautiful



  75. M Suzanne Kowalski on January 10, 2017 at 6:54 pm

    I love Jeffersonian, or Twin Leaf. I look everyday to see if it is blooming and I love the seed pods!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:54 pm

      A new one to me – very pretty



  76. Gloria Lamm on January 10, 2017 at 7:07 pm

    Your book would be the perfect house warming gift for my daughter in Montana.
    My favorite colorful foliage plants are caladiums.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:54 pm

      What a lovely gift! Good luck!



  77. Sarah Sutcliff on January 10, 2017 at 8:20 pm

    Black mondo grass, at the base of black lace edge elderberry. I have a section of front garden devoted to black leaved plants. They do all flower but the uniqueness of black foliage is what it’s all about. These two are my favorites of the bunch.



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:55 pm

      Two great black plants for sure



  78. Jennifer Essad on January 10, 2017 at 8:53 pm

    The Oak Leaf Hydrangea is a new favorite of mine, I’m hoping they’ll spread so I can enjoy them even more. I’m also anxious to see your new book Karen. I can appreciate “filling in” all the open spaces in our garden area



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:56 pm

      I love those hydrangea too. They don’t really spread but they do get much wider with age and look stunning as the bark begins to peel



  79. Pat B on January 10, 2017 at 9:35 pm

    I like ferns generally – partly because the deer leave them alone!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 9:56 pm

      AMEN!



  80. Kate G on January 10, 2017 at 9:59 pm

    Hostas and Helleobores foliage are both are so wonderful, especially the latter I. That it is with us here in the PNW year-round. The variety of form and color are great! Looking forward to your new book!



    • Karen Chapman on January 10, 2017 at 10:18 pm

      Thanks Kate – good luck!



  81. JoAnn Clark on January 10, 2017 at 11:20 pm

    My favorite foliage plants are ferns ~ and hosta ~ and anything green ~*



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:50 pm

      Well that covers your bases JoAnn!



  82. Cathy G. on January 10, 2017 at 11:35 pm

    I like hostas and Hakone grasses and ferns,



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:50 pm

      Fabulous shade plants



  83. Jenny on January 11, 2017 at 1:23 am

    I have always been drawn to dark purple colored foliage. One of my favorites is Cotinus coggygria.



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:51 pm

      I have several; Grace is my favorite



  84. Pam Beck on January 11, 2017 at 6:20 am

    Arum italicum – for winter interest, and to remind me where my hosts are sleeping.



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:52 pm

      Ha ha, I hope you mean hostas not hosts….. 🙂



  85. Jeffrey Krajnik on January 11, 2017 at 7:08 am

    Canadian anemone (Anemone canadensis)



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:52 pm

      Very pretty



  86. Deborah Weaver on January 11, 2017 at 8:24 am

    The larch grove at the homestead was planted in 2004 and is more whimsical with each passing year. Congratulations on a Beautiful book!



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:52 pm

      That sounds wonderful. I’m sure the fall color is magical!



  87. Pattie Knight on January 11, 2017 at 8:27 am

    Variegated foliage is my favorite. Different shapes textures and colors of green. Love my variegated hydrangea.



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:53 pm

      Yes where would we be without our spots, speckles, stripes and splashes?



  88. Patty Pugh on January 11, 2017 at 8:27 am

    I love the Houttuynia Cordata Chameleon.



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:54 pm

      Don’t let it loose though! That is a THUG here in wet soils – but very pretty in a contained pot



  89. Candy Heaps on January 11, 2017 at 9:35 am

    I love Siberian Iris and any type of coleus



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:54 pm

      Nice together too – the iris gives a great vertical accent



  90. Amy Wilson on January 11, 2017 at 9:55 am

    Acalypha wilkesiana ‘Hoffmanii’ Irish Petticoat



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:55 pm

      A new one to me – love the margins on those leaves



  91. Kari on January 11, 2017 at 10:23 am

    Many, many years ago I planted a non-native, jack-in-the-pulpit with 18″-24″ tall leaves, and a slightly mashed looking spath. The leaves stand nearly parallel to the ground and are so perfect, thick and glossy that they look unreal standing above the various ground covers.



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:56 pm

      Sounds very striking – well done!



  92. Peggy Woltjer on January 11, 2017 at 10:36 am

    My favorite plant is an Umbrella tree but I also love Magnolia Bushes! I have the Mag bush but my Umbrella keep dying on me. 🙁



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:57 pm

      We do keep trying don’t we? Maybe a new location?



  93. SusanParker on January 11, 2017 at 12:22 pm

    Congratulations on your new book!!! One of my favourite plants is the Dwarf Korean. Goats beard. I live in zone 3a



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:58 pm

      That looks like a great alternative to the taller plant which is a native here



  94. Roger Higgins on January 11, 2017 at 1:33 pm

    My favorites have got to be Hostas. I have over 100 different varieties and want more. I love the wide variety of sizes, colors and shapes. Maybe a close second would be Coral Bells for the wide choice of bright colors. Angelina Sedum really stands out as my favorite colorful ground cover.



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:59 pm

      I’ve just added that orange-tinted golden groundcover under a burgundy Fireglow maple and around a deep green Hinoki cypress – love it



  95. Josephine Mackenzie on January 11, 2017 at 1:53 pm

    My favourite foliage plant is lavender. Very surprised when it grew back in my garden in the Northwest Territories one summer.



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 1:59 pm

      Impressive! Which variety has been most successful for you?



  96. Tina Knezevic on January 11, 2017 at 2:08 pm

    My favorite indoor foilage plant is the watermelon peperomia as I love the green and silver stripes. My favorite outdoor foilage plant is the Agapanthus as I love to use it as a border around our Shangri-la garden. Love the bright flowers. Absolutely beautiful!



    • Karen Chapman on January 11, 2017 at 5:20 pm

      Good luck Tina!



  97. Maxine Mitchell on January 12, 2017 at 10:18 am

    Looking forward to your book, Karen! My favorite foliage plant is Aralia cordata ‘Sun King’. The bright chartreuse leaves with reddish brown stems that come up in late spring are spectacular in the part-shade to shade garden and really offer a pop of color. But, it can get to 5-6 feet tall and wide, but is airy and light. It’s easy to maintain as you just cut it back to the ground in the late fall or winter. Looks great with ferns, hostas, astilbes and hydrangeas. I divided it last year and now I have two more manageable plants!



    • Karen Chapman on January 12, 2017 at 4:41 pm

      Hi Maxine – I need to try that again. I had mine too dry I think. Good luck with the giveaway!



  98. Lynne Aldridge on January 12, 2017 at 12:56 pm

    Mahonia – almost any, but M. media “Charity” is the most reliable for all year foliage, and Winter colour & scent (blissful – lemony sherbert). One other bonus – light bounces off its large shiny leaves, brightening otherwise dingy areas. We live on a north facing slope, and our Mahonia provides structure and colour in a spot where very little else would thrive. Two other of our very near neighbours already had a Mahonia thriving in their gardens – one even pruned theirs to act like a tree when another neighbour built a shed and further shaded that section of his garden.

    A very rewarding and forgiving plant.



    • Karen Chapman on January 12, 2017 at 4:42 pm

      I first grew Charity in the UK and it is still a favorite of mine, especially as the hummingbirds visit it. Arthur Menzies comes a close second



  99. Shirley Fox on January 12, 2017 at 6:54 pm

    Ornamental grasses, especially native muhly grasses. They look great all year and need little care except a cutback every few years.



    • Karen Chapman on January 12, 2017 at 8:39 pm

      Wish that grass did well here! Good luck Shirley!



  100. Jan F Phillips on January 13, 2017 at 10:45 am

    I am a Hosta fanatic, there are so many subtle varieties to the foliage, from yellow tints to greens to blues, solid or with varigation. They make a shady area so interesting!



    • Karen Chapman on January 13, 2017 at 3:28 pm

      gorgeous choice!



  101. Daniela Baloi on January 13, 2017 at 11:06 am

    Congratulations on your book! There are many favorite foliage plants in my garden! I will need a book to capture them all, lol! Lets say Ice Dance Sedge to add to the variety listed here! It is a low growing grass with yellow variegation that is somewhat semi-evergreen in zone 5.



    • Karen Chapman on January 13, 2017 at 3:29 pm

      That’s a popular one here too



  102. Cynthia Hunt on January 13, 2017 at 11:53 am

    I like Sage, as it is drought-tolerant, stays green all year and has a nice texture to the leaves.



    • Karen Chapman on January 13, 2017 at 3:29 pm

      Agreed – but like the variegated forms even more 🙂



  103. Darci on January 13, 2017 at 1:27 pm

    What a gorgeous Book – Congratulations! I love Tradescantia, especially Spiderwort “Sweet Kate” – what a beauty it is in my dark Wisconsin wooded lot! I am also a fan of Viburnum, all varieties. My son and his wife planted a treeform Viburnum during their garden wedding here at our home, and now, 3 years later, it is a delight. Lovely fall color, beautiful berries, and now in winter, a Bird’s Nest right in the center! We add Begonias for color during the summer, and last July 4 we took a picture of their baby daughter next to the tree with a large orange and yellow Begonia blossom in her hair. Now she’ll forever be known as “Leona Begonia!”



    • Karen Chapman on January 13, 2017 at 3:30 pm

      Thanks for sharing your garden and memories – love! Good luck



  104. Karen Phillips on January 13, 2017 at 4:03 pm

    Artemisia “Powis Castle” – I love it both for the soft gray color, and for the gorgeous texture of the leaves.



    • Karen Chapman on January 13, 2017 at 6:51 pm

      That is a gorgeous plant for sure – if only we didn’t have such wet winters…



  105. Karen Phillips on January 13, 2017 at 7:11 pm

    Yeah, they definitely aren’t at their best during wet winters. We’re cold enough here so they tend to go dormant. I just cut them down, mulch them in, and wait for spring 🙂



  106. Susie Johnson on January 13, 2017 at 8:21 pm

    I love variegated foliage. Currently, I have two variegated rubber plants growing and one variegated Ficus benjamina. Your book looks fantastic!



    • Karen Chapman on January 13, 2017 at 9:08 pm

      Thank you Susie – we hope you enjoy it and good luck with the giveaway!



  107. Patsy Bell Hobson on January 14, 2017 at 8:10 am

    I love coleus. There is a color or variety to fit in every garden theme.



    • Karen Chapman on January 14, 2017 at 10:47 am

      I love that there are some sun-tolerant varieties too!



  108. Joan Brown on January 14, 2017 at 9:12 am

    My favourite foliage plant is hostas, there are so many different varieties.



    • Karen Chapman on January 14, 2017 at 10:47 am

      A popular choice 🙂



  109. Lisa on January 14, 2017 at 4:47 pm

    I love madden hair fern with blue hosts in my yard, but for house plants (in my zone 6) sandaveria veriaties. Dark greens are so pretty in the winters.



    • Karen Chapman on January 16, 2017 at 2:00 pm

      I love our native western maidenhair fern with crinkled blue Love Pat hosta also!



  110. Carol Cole on January 14, 2017 at 8:14 pm

    Love my Aeonium ‘Sunburst’ that keeps getting bigger and bigger!



    • Karen Chapman on January 16, 2017 at 2:00 pm

      Jealous – houseplant for me – or summer annual



  111. Joanna Kata on January 15, 2017 at 12:40 pm

    I love Imperata cylindrica ‘Red Baron’! It’s one of that plants where the foliage are beautifull! I am in love with all ornamental grasses, but in Poland it isn’t as popular as in other countries. I want to change that and I think that I’m on good way. 🙂



    • Karen Chapman on January 16, 2017 at 2:01 pm

      Changing the world one leaf at a time – well done!



  112. Rose Hollis on January 15, 2017 at 8:00 pm

    Congratulations, Karen! I am sure this new labor of love with be very successful. The favorite foliage plant in my landscape is the Serviceberry. Though bare in the winter, this shrubby tree blossoms early, then sets fruit which attracts so many beautiful birds all through the month of June – in particular Cedar Waxwings right outside my kitchen window! The leaves are lovely as well – silvery light green and teardrop shaped.



    • Karen Chapman on January 16, 2017 at 2:02 pm

      Hi Rose, thanks for entering the giveaway. Love encouraging birds into our gardens



  113. Ruth on January 16, 2017 at 1:14 pm

    Looking forward to the book. The foliage plant at the top of my wishlist right now is Farfugium ‘Kin Kan’, I’d love to add it to my garden. Farfugium and Rhodea, especially with a little variegation are simply stunning.



    • Karen Chapman on January 16, 2017 at 2:02 pm

      Oooohhhhh! Good luck!